Category Archives: Cars

I am a car salesman looking to be different. I want to help people get new cars right.

mDimitry: Branding Like a Boss

Have you ever given someone some advice- but really meant it to be pointed at yourself. I recently talked to one of my friends, Michael Lindberg, at the rock climbing gym about branding- and told him to “Just do it” in reference to putting himself out there more often. He did that next day. Check out his Instagram.

If you follow me Dimitry Sells Cars you’ll see that I have been growing. I’ve been posting a ton, but this month I pulled back a bit of my budget. I have been trying to do things a little bit more organically. More posts- adding money only if they appear to be getting traction. I did also have a long-term ad campaign with the walk around videos that Dick Hannah Volkswagen did for 4 VW models. If you haven’t- watch these videos below: 2017 VW Golf Alltrack with Dimitry Makhanov

2017 Volkswagen Tiguan with Dimitry Makhanov

2017 Volkswagen Passat with Dimitry Makhanov 

2017 Volkswagen Jetta with Dimitry Makhanov

I’ve had some mixed results. Overall my page is growing. I think it’s easy to really get super excited about how much. I mean- take a look at all the green numbers!

Stats for Dimitry Sells Cars from Mar 31, 2017 – Apr 27, 2017.

But I’m not satisfied. The numbers look great- but I’ve only had had 2 concrete appointments from this effort this month. 5 Prospects- but only two people showed up. Who knows how many other people see this effort and are thinking to themselves – maybe soon I’ll need a car and I’ll reach out to this guy. I know I need to build better sales funnels- In fact, I’ve worked a little bit with Steven Howsley of Begin a Brand.  He’s been helping me develop audience groups for my videos.

So- what’s the point of all this struggle. Why the Title- Branding like a Boss. How does this help me as a reader? I see you are working on… something? The idea behind branding is to associate yourself with some task or product. I happen to sell cars. I want people to know that I sell cars- so that I can sell more of them. The goal is to build Brand Awareness, which then leads to… Leads. I turn those Leads into sales- which then turn into loyal repeat customers.

Building Brand Awareness to build Leads, Sales, and Loyalty

In this effort- what seems to be working for me.

  1. Consistency. I am posting on my facebook page 1-3 times a day.2

  2. Persistence. I don’t stop. It sounds like consistency- but it’s not. If something doesn’t work- it doesn’t mean you should stop doing it all together. Just try and learn what you need to from it.

  3. Humility. Don’t worry about what it will look like if you don’t get it right the first time- or someone gives you a negative response. You are learning- and have a long way to go. In fact- if you get a negative response- ask for advice for next time. Ask for help.

  4. Having fun. I am trying to gamify this whole process for myself. Yes- it is how I’m trying to grow my business, but it’s fun to try and out do yourself. I got 50 new followers in my last 28 days. The time before that I only got 16. That’s huge. Now I have to get 100 this time around? Setting

  5. Set goals. I got 50 new followers in my last 28 days. The time before that I only got 16. That’s huge. Now I have to get 100 this time around? Why not 150?

  6. Don’t forget the point- branding is to help you build leads- not make sales. Actually forgetting to do the sales part is something you can fall into. I have actual leads and existing business I can lose track of if I spend too much time playing around with this ‘branding campaign.’ Never lose track of your existing business.

  7. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. People love helping people. I’ve been working a bit with Steven– If you need help branding- try him. Or ask me. I have lots of cool connections.

  8. Build out new stuff- especially if you found it worked out in the past in other endeavors. I’m about to start a new Instagram and follow my old guide on How to Build an Instagram Following. On that note- Please Follow my new Instagram.

 

mDimitry: Yourself as a Business.

Years ago- I read something about Bill Gates. It is said he was making so much money that it wasn’t worth the effort for him to bend over and pick up a $100 bill off the ground should he accidentally drop one. This situation is defined by the concept of opportunity cost, the thought that doing one thing limits the opportunity to do another. The notion of opportunity costs haunts me to this day.

What does it cost to do what I am doing at the moment? I’m sitting down at a Starbucks working on my blog. Does an activity benefit me or hurt me? Could I be doing something else? Should I be doing something else- or if I continue- will I somehow receive my big break here? What would a big break look like, and how would I know it? What about doing my job selling cars? Should I work on my day off- or should I blog- or should I take a nap. How do you make that sort of trade off?

Selling cars, I make money on commissions, yet most of my life my employment was hourly. I make more money now, but when it is slow- it is hard not think about how much money I would have had if I was working hourly. I still find it good to break down my income monthly and give myself a baseline income to judge what I take on to see if it is worth it or not.

So far so good. But for how long? And what’s next? Am I worth more- and how do I reach my potential. Every self-help book I’ve managed to power through has a similar refrain- find something you are passionate about and do that, hard. Follow your dreams.

But what are my passions, what are my dreams? How do I find them? Recently I read “You’re a Bad Ass” by Jen Sincero- who suggested I think back on when I was in my ‘element.’ Think about the time that you were obsessed with something and got good. Really good at something. Think about what that felt like- and what I was doing at the time. For me, two things stand out, and I could be slightly embarrassed about them- but I think the world is a bit more accepting. Both were video games I had played.

The first one was a game called Monarchy. Think Clash of Clans but text based. At first- this game was a bit dense, but one of my high school buddies was into it- and MMO’s weren’t much of a thing just yet so there was a bit of an appeal. I wanted to do all things online as my family just got its first computer and our dial-up connection was very slow. This game turned out to work perfectly with a slow dial-up connection.

It started innocently enough- log in- build and attack and log off. Then I got attacked- and realized people were playing on teams (guilds), and if you weren’t on a team, you were easy prey. I joined a guild- and that’s when things got interesting. Turned out- I was chatting with people all over the world, and many of them were very smart. Programmers, writers, businessmen from all over.

And they were all interested in winning. And since it was a numbers based game- you had to understand the way the numbers worked in the game. The guys reversed engineered the game- and had a pretty solid database. We’d look for patterns in the database- make plans- negotiate alliances and non-aggression pacts. We’d spy- we’d coerce- we’d sabotage alliances. I was spending 3-5 hours a day planning, writing, thinking, analyzing and negotiating the next move. This game taught me to write, think, strategize. I loved it. I ended up quitting when I realized I wouldn’t graduate high school.

The other game was Parallel Kingdom. A cell phone game that used Google maps and GPS to create an alternate- parallel- world that was full of monsters to kill and land to conquer. I downloaded it- and it didn’t work. I checked on it a few months later- and they had updated it, and it worked alright- but people had already taken over all the land around me.

I struggled at first getting around, finding a place to build, and then collecting resources. Met the locals, and one of them traded something with a stranger in front of me. I thought it was weird, and asked them about it. They told me to be careful of scammers. People who stole from other players. My friend told me what sort of ‘resources’ to collect and for how much to sell them. I gathered the resources- went on the game’s world chat and summoned a trader.

His name was CashMoney. I told me to drop the resources- he’d collect- and I would get the money. I wasn’t dumb. I thought that was crazy. He didn’t care. He told me he never went first since he was a legit and I was a ‘noob.’ This was a dilemma. I asked on the chat about him- and it seemed like it was safe to trade with him.

I made the trade- and then we talked. It turned out- CashMoney was incredibly wealthy in the game. I didn’t realize that wealth within the game was compared. He also told me he typically doesn’t bother convincing new players into trading with him. But since he’d never seen me- he’d give me a lesson and leniency. He explained a few things about trading- told me to keep my nose clean. After that- I was hooked.

I was the Bill Gates of that game. It got to the point where I was affecting the markets with decisions to buy- or sell specific things.

Both of these games capitalized on my desire to see patterns, watch trends, engage other people while keeping track of the score. There were clear metrics for winning in my mind. In Monarchy- it was all about getting our guild to win- and in Parallel Kingdom it was about getting more ‘gold.’

Now I look at what work I am doing. I am selling cars. I know I like games- I love figuring stuff out and making it work for me. I’ve been trying to figure out a way to make this feel like one of the games I was playing.

I’ve been wracking my brains and come up with something. I want to gamify my efforts as I grow as a business person. Weird word- gamify- but I think it’s something to help me keep motivated as I try to expand my abilities.

The first thing I want to start with is this blog. I haven’t been working on it much- and traffic on it has died off a bit. I’ve been too busy to spend much time here. And I didn’t have a clear objective that would help me sell cars- or get better as a business person. I knew I wanted to do a blog… and have it help… but didn’t know how or to what end.

So- starting today- mDimitry.biz is the overall focus of my day today thought process (as it relates to making money.) I am going to think of myself- the business person- a consultant/independent contractor who is hired out from mDimitry.biz to various places- like Dick Hannah. I know it’s not official yet- but eventually, I might make it so. That means I’m working on an assignment for this blog as a car salesman and want to explore what a good one is- to report back to this blog. I’ll take on various projects that will hopefully help me.

For example, I have some experience with social media- and that’s one of the first projects I’m going to start to push. I have a Facebook page called “Dimitry Sells Cars.” I currently have 255 followers. I want to grow that number to… I don’t know… 5,000? Have regular engagement and work out a system that would allow me to get car deals when I invest time. Starting now- I’ll record how much time I look at the Facebook page- and keep track. I’ll attribute a dollar amount to the time spent- as well as actual money spent on Advertising through Facebook. I’ll work on making the whole exchange profitable.

That’s the second part- I want my projects to work together- but all the knowledge I pick up will be funneled back here and dissected and explored. Hopefully you- as the reader- find that interesting and will read up here. Maybe comment.

The final part- I want to review different books/blogs/and resources through which I am working. I will interview others who I see as real business people and report on those interviews. Hopefully, this will provide bigger better ideas for how to more forward with my business.

All in all- I really look forward to working on this little project more. Stay tuned- I’m going to try to post at least once a week- maybe twice. So subscribe.

A check in from Dimitry at Volkswagen

I’ve been working in the auto industry for eight months now, and it has been an exciting opportunity. And by exciting, I mean my first day at the Dick Hannah Volkswagen dealership was the day they announced the Diesel Gate Emissions Scandal.

I very much remember those first two weeks. Lot’s people scared, confused, and angry. We had just started running a little promo to get people into test drive vehicles- and none of the employees want to talk to anyone. They were hiding in the sales office, avoiding awkward conversations.

I being green and new loved the opportunity to talk to everyone I possibly could. It was fun, in a strange and weird way, it was something like popping huge pimples. Now I see things turning around. Next month there will be a resolution by Volkswagen with the EPA on the whole matter- and I’ve heard some pretty hopeful news.

Lot’s of people have asked me- why Volkswagen. Why not leave? Why not go somewhere they have tons of foot traffic- internet leads they don’t know how to handle- no scandal that hangs over them like a dark cloud?

It comes back to my dad. We had a few Volkswagens over the years, but the one that stands out was a Golf. My dad’s pride and joy. I think it was a mid-nineties gas model. He was working in life insurance and drove that thing into the ground. 360k miles on the little thing, driving back and forth between Portland, Seattle, and Spokane. That was incredible. It was the manual on which I learned to drive stick. It was so powerful, versatile, and handled better than anything I’d driven by that point.

When I chose Volkswagen as a company- I liked the vibe of the commercials, I liked the product, and I liked the direction they were going and where they had been. I don’t know what the hell happened with the TDI debacle, but I do know that it’s not endemic of the company ethos.

It will be interesting to see how they will pull through. I’ve bought into it, and I think I’ll continue to be. In fact- I just bought the 2016 Passat SE. The people I’ve met who own them have been incredibly happy. The new 2016 has some pretty neat new features, like Autonomous Breaking and Adaptive Cruise Control. The new body styling is great, and the backup camera is a must. The SE comes equipped with the Discover Media computer. The computer is a touch screen that incorporates Apple’s Car Play and Android Auto/Mirror Link. I love the silly thing. I got the white one with the lighter Cornsilk Leatherette- and soon I’ll be tinting the windows.

I’m curious, what do you guys think? Am I crazy? Or is this long game I’m playing the right way to go? How is this going to affect me as a business?

Also, hit me up if you want to take my car out for a spin! I’d love to show it off! 😛 Email Me! 

HowTo to Finding the Loss Leader Car

I sold a car yesterday, a 2016 VW Jetta SEL 1.8 TSI. According to TrueCar, this morning (4/17/16) the target price for this car is $22,556, or $2,909 below the MSRP of $25,465.

I sold it for $20,900. That’s a huge saving- a $4,566 discount! How did the client score this deal? Were they super negotiators? Were they friends and family? What’s the secret? I often get shoppers looking for the best deal on the lot, and this certainly was the best deal. But why was it so low?

It all has to do with marketing. Every company has a myriad of marketing tools that they try to use to get buyers in the door. During one of our sales meetings, I heard that on average we spend something like $350 per car sold.

We do traditional things, like television and radio. We’ve been doing PPC and SEO. We are even trying to push into social media. Each sales person goes through lists of past clients trying to drum up repeat and referral client. All of it pushing hard to make sure we bring people in.

One of the big no-nos in every industry is lying to your clients. It just shouldn’t happen, and if the company is reputable, which mine is, they have to back up promises with reality. How does a company trying to make a profit make giant claims about huge discounts and still stay in business?

Enter one of the oldest marketing strategy, the loss leader. A loss leader is a pricing strategy where a product is sold at a price below its market cost (Wikipedia). Our dealership has a few things that dictate the price of cars. One of which is the age of the vehicle, as in how long it has been on the ground at our dealership. Another is availability. Sometimes manufacturers let us know that we have ten cars of the same model coming in next Tuesday, and we will be overstocked on that model. And finally, the prices at which our competitors are listing their cars. All of these things create room for us to sell one of the cars at a little bit of loss. One of our cars we will listed as a loss leader, leaving all of the other cars priced regularly.

We advertise that loss leaders heavily. We use all our usual channels to let the clients know, and get them excited about that car. Here’s the catch, if you want that car, but it’s missing some feature you need, we’ll switch you to a different car. The special pricing doesn’t apply.

To get the best deal on the car- you have to want that particular car. If you are a value shopper, keep an eye out for those loss leaders. One great way to ferret out loss leaders that I have noticed recently is to turn your cookies on in your browser. Cookies are a small text file (up to 4KB) created by a Web site that is stored on the user’s computer either temporarily for that session only or permanently on the hard disk (persistent cookie). Cookies provide a way for the Web site to recognize you and keep track of your preferences. (Source: pcmag)
Once you have turned them on, figure out which brand of car you want to buy. Go to their website. Go to the dealership website. Look at the car you like.

Do it a few times.

Now keep an eye out for banner ads! Cookies will let advertisers know which car you are interested in, and will tell them with what to tempt you. Suddenly you might notice that there are ads for cars recently looked by you! I know this sounds pretty creepy but trust me it’s totally worth it.

If you liked this article, check out my Guide to Researching Cars. 

Buying a car- Cash or Financing?

Word is finally getting out to my friends that I am working at Dick Hannah Volkswagen as a sales and leasing consultant. I haven’t really been spreading the word as aggressively as I should, and my circle of friends is very wide, so it makes sense that its taken so long for people to catch on. It’s pretty awesome getting calls about cars.

Recently a long-lost friend of mine asked me if he should pay for a car outright with cash or purchase it through some sort of financing.

This gentleman served in the military for about 8 years. He was Navy, and I assume spent a lot of time on tour, billeted, on the government’s dime. He had had a steady income, fairly low expenses, and was able to save up some money. He’s now a civilian trying to figure out what’s best for him and his family financially.

He has an aging car. He knows it’s time to upgrade his vehicle to avoid the potential expense of keeping his old car running. On top of that, his car still has some inherent value he wants to use in the purchase of a new vehicle.

In the future, he wants to keep his monthly expenses down as well as limit the amount he will pay for the new vehicle by avoiding paying interest. Also, he thinks that the dealership might a prefer selling cars for a for the car and would prefer it?

Dealerships do not actually prefer to receive cash/check for cars anymore. In fact, the dealership would probably rather finance the cars. Why would they give you a discount to do something they don’t want you to do? (Don’t get me wrong, people with cash often make good clients, but it has more to their willingness to do the deal now as they have been planning for it.)

Did you know that banks will often pay the dealership to underwrite through them? Banking was once a very risky business. (To all the bankers out there, yes- I know banking is still very risky… but not as bad as it once was.) But now we have fairly accurate credit scores and high-tech methods to validate and track people, making it much safer to loan money.

That safety allows for banks to accurately gauge and manage risk. Having an accurate gauge of creditworthiness allows the banks to offer very competitive interest rates to customers.

Here’s where things get interesting. My friend has to gauge opportunity costs of spending his money on a vehicle all at once. Opportunity costs are the loss of potential gains from choosing one alternative over another.

For example. What if he can get a loan for 5 years at 2% interest? The money would be free to invest. Say he is very lucky and gets an average of 8% a year for 5 years. That would be of benefit to him, no?

But what if he takes a loan, and lacks discipline? Spends the money elsewhere, and then ends up not being able to afford the car. What if he can’t keep a job. What if the market crashes like it did back in 2008, and the US economy lost trillions and the investments he put his money into all go sour. What if you want to buy a house and your debt to income ratio is too far off to get it?

It all comes down to a matter of preference, and risk management. I personally believe he should buy the car using financing if the interest rate is low. I assume he can manage his money well enough if he is asking for advice on the topic, and also managed to save enough money for this to be a question. He must try to keep his loan from being underwater by putting enough of a downpayment to allow for flexibility in the future if something comes up. A car’s value tanks like a rock after the purchase. Should he need to get rid of it, it’s good to have a smaller loan balance than amount owed.

Why would you invest into something that is a liability? Keep the money, be wise with it. Having cash that you can invest in your future goes a long way. There is a phrase in business,  “Debt is cheaper than equity.” Read the article to see what I mean.

Another great article gives you some good advice: Here

Guide to Car Buying: Research (work in progress)

It is never fun having nightmares. I recently had one about the car buying experience. Full on a horrific, tragic, and morally draining dream. Bad dreams about buying a car are weird because I’m a car salesman. I understand this is because things that stress you out are typically things you dream about, and it’s my brain’s way of unfolding the events of my day.

But a big part of my time is spent ‘informing‘ people about what it is they should do. In a weird sense, that’s like asking an alligator to teach you to swim. I recognize this is job security for me, but I alway love those deals where the person comes in, informed, and has everything ready for me. They know what car’s they want to drive. They know their credit score, have a down payment. Everything is ready.

It is not hard to get a car, just like it’s not hard getting a loan. You can walk into a payday loan office, or log onto a website, and get one in 5 minutes. It won’t be very much, and you aren’t going to be getting anything that resembles a real deal. Same with a car. Car buying is easy, but doing it well requires a bit of research and preplanning.

This preparation should happen at home.

Google is a fantastic tool. Just type in “how to buy a car” and see what comes up. Perhaps that’s how you found this post. Awesome!

A superb starting point is building out a budget. Budgeting should be the hardest part of buying a car. Most of the car buying experience hinge on what your credit score is, how much you are willing/can to do as a downpayment, and finally what are your payments. Budgeting takes time, but it will build you up for a successful car buying experience, as well as help keeps ownership costs reasonable.

A cool resource for budgeting is Mint. This part is a must. Stop reading – go there – now. Set it up, and begin using this. Seriously. They have articles on money, spending, and how much you should target your spending on different things. Specifically a car.

I know Mint has an excellent credit score tracker, but I like to give people options. Credit Karma is another one. I have been Credit Karma lately because it mainly focuses on just credit scores. (Side note- this is just a reference, not the exact credit score you’ll be using when you purchase a car. And your credit score doesn’t reflect all of your experience with different lending companies. If, for example, you bought a Volkswagen- using VWCredit as the lender- and had the car repossessed they might not be willing to work with you again. The opposite is true as well, if you bought a Volkswagen filed for bankruptcy but kept paying on your auto loan, they might be willing to lend you money again because you were a good client.)

Once you get the budget squared away and have been living a good clean life where you’ve been saving up some money- you can begin to look at what kind of cars you want. Motor Trend is a great resource. They have tons of reviews, news, and other critical information. Very well polished. Love it.

Another excellent site I’ve been reading quite a bit myself has been Edmunds. They have some magnificent tools. They help frame the purchasing experience. They have a splendid, long, story about how one of their new writers works at for a car dealership under cover. This story is an awesome way to learn what my job.

A solid golden standard is Kelly Blue Book. KBB is a fantastic resource to find out what your used car is worth. (A little note, what your current vehicle is worth does not always equate to what it’s value is; furthermore a car’s market value is different than trade in value. This is HUGE. I will write an article about this.)

And this final site I’d recommend is True Car. True Car a resource that helps after you have narrowed down what vehicle you are buying and gives you an excellent price reference for what you want to be paying.

After you decide on which car you one- begin looking for a dealership with which you want to work. A really good site I’ve been enjoying is Dealer Rater. Dealer Rater is where I am rated most often. Searching for the dealership on Google, Yelp, and the other usual sites are ok I guess.

[ I think this is all I have for now. This post is a work in progress. I will be updating this post, so feel free to keep an eye on it. Feel free to comment, or email me. I also have a new email for this blog. me@mdimitry.biz ]