Tag Archives: PICR

Tools I use for Blogging

I had an English teacher turn me onto writing at a relatively early age. I believe I was 13 years old; I had an English teacher, Mr. Carter. I remember him standing on his desk quoting Walt Whitman. His slightly crazy eyes were looking over our class as he, with his best orators voice, yelled, “I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world.” It was the start of the year, and I remember him getting me so pumped on these old writers.

He had a creative writing assignment where we were to write a short story. We talked about writing novels. We were asked to keep a journal. A journal is this weird thing that happens with a notebook; you know like blank paper bound together, within which one writes. If you date it, you have a pretty good record of your life. Writing helps keep track of your thoughts and progressions in life.

At some point I realized my penmanship was atrocious, and if I typed out my entries I could read them again later.  I began keeping it on online platforms. Then it began to be popular to have blogs. I think my first real blog was on Xanga. I tried MySpace and Facebook’s solutions as well. I went blogger, and now I’m on WordPress.

There are some tools that I use to do my blogging.

  1. Site Location/Design:

I have purchased a bunch of different domains on various websites. I mostly use GoDaddy. I have added HostGator to this for my web hosting. They make it easy to setup a WordPress site from the control panel.

I currently favor using WordPress for an actual framework for the site. It seems to make it pretty easy to integrate it with a few other programs.

  1. Monitoring:

Once you get the site up and going, I recommend you set up Google Analytics. Also, make sure you head over to Google Webmaster Tools and Adsense.

Google Analytics lets you monitor how your site is doing, where you are getting your traffic, and how much time people spend looking at your site.

Google Webmaster Tools give you a pretty good understanding how you are doing on Google rankings, as well as if there are major problems with your website.

Adsense allows you to make money on your blog. Having Adsense ads on your site is a double-edged sword. They clutter your site,  but they might have the potential to make your money. If you have lots of traffic, they could help pay for your efforts, but they could also frustrate your viewers.

  1. Content:

I don’t use anything but my brain to develop content. I use my personal experiences to find things about which to write. I do have problems editing my work. Making sure your content is relevant is important. But also making sure it’s legible is pretty significant as well. I’ve been using Grammarly since an embarrassing mistake I made while working for PICR. I thought I had proofread my writing, and I also showed someone else as well. I know that Grammarly would have fixed a bunch of what was wrong with the writing as well.

  1. Promotion:

I like it when I get feedback on my work. The idea that someone will read my work makes me strive to make it worth reading. I could write an awesome guide to buying a car, or growth hacking your Instagram, but what’s the point if no one reads it?

I’ve been getting lots of success using Social Media. Facebook, in particular, has a way of allowing things to go viral. I hear you can have the same thing happen with Twitter, still trying to figure that out. Instagram and LinkedIn have been pretty good to me as well.

SEO is an important part of traffic. It relies on good content. But there is also a little know thought about the internet; it rewards interest. Finding out what words looked for online, you can build your blog around those topics.

The final thing is making sure you get people to link to your website. If you get people to share your articles on their websites, it helps with how search engines few your site! So- please link back to this! šŸ˜€

(I plan on working on this as I change things up, or learn more.)

How to Kill Ideas and Still End up Ahead: the Art of Stepping Away

I’ve been working for a guy named Vitaliy Rizhkov. He has been the founder Finic, which has been like an incubator for theĀ companies I’ve worked for in the last 7 months. Not sure if you’ve been keeping track, but last week I went from Hipture to PICR. Crazy exciting move. The story I see unfolding with Vitaliy reminds me of the book I’m currently reading.

If you haven’t read the book by Tony Hsieh- you probably should. The book, Delivering Happiness: a path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose is about the story Tony tells about himself moving from being a kid into adulthood. It is his life laid out, his strengths his weaknesses, and the development of the mindsets that have lead to the creation of huge companies. A casual read that really gets into his story; I feel like I’ve had a long coffee break with the guy. Tony is very inspirational. And very much akin to the story I’ve recently experienced a crazy move by my boss.

Last Monday- the Hipture project was shut down. Our Kickstart was 120% funded, and Vitaliy yanked the cord. So many people were left adrift. I can’t describe how disorienting the whole thing felt.

We had an all hands meeting on Thursday where Vitaliy explained the situation. It really reminded me of the way Tony Hsieh describes the game of poker. Tony goes into some detail about his belief that poker is akin to starting a business. He lists of ways that Poker is similar to creating a business. I’ll just list a few bullet points:

-Table Selection is the most important decision you can make.

-It’s okay to switch tables if you discover it’s too hard to win at your table.

-You need to adjust your style of play through the night as the dynamics of the game change. Be flexible.

He describes that building a business is very similar to sitting down to a poker table. The dynamics between your skill level vs your competition’s dictate your potential for winning. Not all tables are created equal, and strategically moving from a table you can’t win at is appropriate. It’s not that you can’t win individual hands, but being able to win in the long term. It’s easy to get caught up in the hand, and sometimes you just have to accept that it’s time to stand up and move to a different table.

In my mind, it was like Vitaliy was playing at two tables at the same time. Somehow this game allowed you to play both tables with the same bankroll. On the Hipture table, he had a decent hand. We payed the blind to see the flop. The hand was ok. Our Kickstarted got funded, but it was lackluster. On the PICR table, he gets a REALLY good hand. Instead of waiting to see how things played out on the Hipture table, he folded and pulled his money out to go all in on PICR. It’s good to be flexible and embrace the changes. Especially when they are they right move. (Sorry if you don’t play poker and completely miss the analogy. You should try it out, very interesting game.)

Vitaliy believes in the work fast, fail fast system. It’s akin the Jordan’s “you can’t make the baskets you didn’t shoot” but with the business focus. Not dawdling over a decision, but moving forward with confidence. So, you’ll see me working hard and fast with PICR. I’m still involved in working with influencers. I’ll still be on Instagram quite a bit. No dawdling with indecision. I really look forward to what this week entails!

If you are a photographer, you HAVE to sign up. You really don’t have a choice. Like… at all. PICR is a game changer. Get in early, and get in while the getting is good. For all of those people I worked with on Hipture, let’s keep things going. I think there’s still plenty of crossovers.

I’m curious if this is a common thing that people experience? Have you ever worked at a startup? Tell me about your craziest pivot? How did it turn out? Let me know! I’m super curious!